The House by the Side of the Road

Though perhaps not as avid a poetry lover as a couple of our dear sisters, 😉 I do hold an appreciation for well-composed lines that concisely communicate truth in an easy-to-remember format. The other day Daniel and I were discussing hospitality and the commands of Scripture to love one another, and the following poem came to mind. Perhaps a little quaint in it’s style and expression, 🙂 we were blessed by the spirit of love, compassion, and kindness it portrays, and wanted to share it with you. May each of us understand in a deeper way the love that our Savior bears toward us, so that we may in turn be vessels that convey that love to others!

“This is my commandment, that ye love one another, as I have loved you. Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.” John 15: 12-13

“Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins. Beloved, if God so loved us, we ought also to love one another.” 1 John 4:10-11

 

The House by the Side of the Road
Sam Walter Foss

There are hermit souls that live withdrawn
In the peace of their self-content;
There are souls, like stars, that dwell apart,
In a fellowless firmament;
There are pioneer souls that blaze their paths
Where highways never ran;
But let me live by the side of the road
And be a friend to man.

Let me live in a house by the side of the road,
Where the race of men go by
The men who are good and the men who are bad,
As good and as bad as I.
I would not sit in the scorner’s seat,
Or hurl the cynic’s ban;
Let me live in a house by the side of the road
And be a friend to man.

I see from my house by the side of the road,
By the side of the highways of life,
The men who press with the ardor of hope,
The men who are faint with the strife.
But I turn not away from their smiles nor their tears – 
Both parts of an infinite plan;
Let me live in my house by the side of the road
And be a friend to man.

I know there are brook-gladdened meadows ahead
And mountains of wearisome height;
And the road passes on through the long afternoon
And stretches away to the night.
But I still rejoice when the travelers rejoice
And weep with the strangers that moan,
Nor have I my house by the side of the road
Like a man who dwells alone.

Let me live in my house by the side of the road
Where the race of men go by – 
They are good, they are bad, they are weak, they are strong,
Wise, foolish – so am I.

Then why should I sit in the scorner’s seat
Or hurl the cynic’s ban?
Let me live in my house by the side of the road
And be a friend to man.